EXPLORE CANADA’S DINOSAUR PROVINCIAL PARK with this slideshow, check the location map and get all the facts and information below.

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Map showing the location of Dinosaur Provincial Park world heritage site in CanadaFactfile

Website Category: The Fossil Record

Area: 75 km2

Inscribed: 1979

Criteria:

  • Outstanding natural beauty (vii);
  • Fossil record (viii)

Location and Values: Dinosaur Provincial Park is a small scenic area in the badlands of western Canada where a vast number of dinosaur fossils have been discovered, dating from the ‘Age of Reptiles’ around 75 million years ago.

Conservation Status and Prospects. According to IUCN’s recent Conservation Outlook Assessment the conservation status of this site is ‘good’. The IUCN report notes that ‘the outstanding scenic landscapes and the geological and palaeontological values and attributes of the site are in good condition and of low concern. Threats are generally at low level, with major threats from resource development being largely confined to areas outside the boundary, and minor threats from visitor use satisfactorily controlled by current management intervention measures. The ongoing threat of some concern is from illegal removal of fossils and this requires constant vigilance and improved field surveillance from staff with assistance from the local community. The property is strongly protected in perpetuity and is professionally managed under an effective administrative regime. There is good support from key stakeholders.’

Links:
Google Earth
Official UNESCO Site Details
IUCN Conservation Outlook
UNEP-WCMC Site Description

Slideshow description

Images of Dinosaur Provincial Park World Heritage Site in Canada

The photos in this slideshow are intended to ‘tell the story’ of the Dinosaur Provincial Park and the remarkable discoveries that have been made there. Visitor access is restricted to a small area of the park, and involves guided tours to some of the places where important finds have been made and special exhibits installed. Walks to these areas pass through dramatic landscapes, where rain and wind have carved the landscape in dramatic ways with ‘hanging rocks’, hoodoos and colourful exposed strata. The story of the world heritage site would not be complete without a visit to the Royal Tyrell Museum (some 170 km away in Drumheller), where many of the park’s fossils are exhibited in a superb way, as illustrated in the slideshow.

This page of the website is still under development and a more detailed description of the various aspects of the site will be included in due course – so please come back again soon!

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